Feminstream

English

Pippi Longstocking and Queen of Narnia @FeminStream

When I was a child, there was no internet in Georgia. We did not have tv series or access to comics. For me, books used to be the only way to escape from reality.

By Natia Gvianishvili

Narrative of Sexual Violence in Pop Music @FeminStream

Approximately 20 years ago Tori Amos became the first famous musician who devoted a song to the issue of sexual violence. She told a story of how she became a victim at the age of 21.

By Lili Mamulashvili

Daniella Zalcman and Women's Photography @FeminStream

Daniella Zalcman is a documentary photographer based between London and New York. 

By Khatuna Khabuliani

Female Perspective in the Recent Georgian Movies @FeminStream

The recent success of the Georgian movies is largely connected with female directors.

By Teo Khatiashvili

The Battle That is Not Over @FeminStream /Music/

With nervous and defiant voice, in her track "That Battle is Over" Jenny Hval sings: "Statistics and newspapers tell me that I am unhappy and dying".

By Lili Mamulashvili

Natali Djurberg @FeminStream /Art/

Natalie Djurberg is best known for producing claymation short films, where characters have shocking behaviour and do not leave place for morality.  

By Khatuna Khabuliani

"First Feminist Film from the Soviet Union" @FeminStream /Movies/

Lana Ghoghoberidze's film Some Interviews on Personal Matters shattered the image of Emansipated Soviet Woman.

By Teo Khatiashvili

Chloe liked Olivia @FeminStream /Literature/

"We have already discussed Bechdel test, which states, that if a work of fiction features at least two women who talk to each other about something other than a man - it is already very good. And if these women love each other - that's even better." 

By Natia Gvianishvili

Louise Bourgeois’ Spider ‘Maman’ @FeminStream /Art/

'I have been to hell and beck, and let me tell you – it was wonderfull.' Podcast (16) about arts (in Georgian):

By Khatuna Khabuliani

Handmaid's Left Hand @FeminStream /Literature/

Fantasy in literature is extremely male dominated, even though Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is considered to be the the first work of the genre.

By Natia Gvianishvili

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